10 Diebenkorn rules and a quote by Mondrian

It must have happen in the time when Richard Diebenkorn once again left disoriented critics and observers when he came back to abstraction. An artistic trip, that of Diebenkorn, that they found it hard  to follow. It was in his...
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Sangram Majumdar: Close to things

The artistic fluctuations of Sangram Majumdar between the figurative and the abstract, or in that hybrid in-between, as he calls it, seem to be a reflection of his own personal story. He was born in Calcutta, India, and moved to...
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Florencio Galindo The Legacy of a Master

In March of 2015 I had the opportunity to interview Master painter Florencio Galindo in his study of Avila. A year and a half later he passed away. This video shows a summary of that afternoon of conversation in which...
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  • Speed, Harold, 1872-1957; Sir Walter Essex (1857-1941)
  • Speed, Harold, 1872-1957; Old Tom

Harold Speed: Two essential books

A Master Legacy Harold Speed (11 February 1872 – 20 March 1957) was a famous English painter and member of the Royal Society of Portrait Painters. His work, especially his portraits, in both oil and charcoal, is exceptionally elegant and...
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How to clean oil paint brushes and enjoy it

I have to admit to becoming a paint brush geek. I’ve gone from being completely indifferent to treating them with a care that borders on the unhealthy. And the person most responsible for my pious conversion to this good practice...
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The great voyage of Velázquez

In the early part of 1649, the spanish painter Diego de Silva Velázquez received a commission from King Philip IV to travel to Italy. Among his other courtly functions as valet de chambre to the King, Velázquez was in charge...
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Miguel Coronado: the lenguage of painting

That purity of heart that genuinely good men possess is plainly visible in Miguel Coronado. And when it comes to painting, this honest artist speaks passionately and perhaps, as he says himself, a bit too loudly. Invariably good humored, he’s...
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Stuart Shils: The magic of visual perception

Stuart Shils told me the following anecdote during my conversation with him. While on one of his summers in Italy with JSS (Jerusalem Studio School), he went to view Piero della Francesca’s painting The Flagellation of Christ with a group...
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Alex Kanevsky; the Art of Teaching

Alex Kanevsky stops in front of a student’s easel. With a hand placed on his chin, he casts a concentrated eye over the work and ponders on the exact words with which to articulate his ideas. His attitude expresses respect...
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Josef Albers Interaction of Color

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text] The true passion of Josef Albers (1888-1976) was teaching. A German artist who studied at the Bauhaus and was later exiled to the United States, he dedicated his life as an educator to an ambitious project; teaching his students...
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